Halacha Category: Kosher Kitchen

Practical Applications

A utensil that never touches food directly (such as the grate on a stovetop) does not require tevila.[1] A utensil which is always used with something covering it, such as a toaster rack that always has silver foil on it, still requires tevila, since the covering is insignificant, and is considered to be part of […]

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How to Perform Tevila

One must immerse the entire utensil in water in one shot. If a part of the utensil is sticking out of the water, the tevila is not valid.[1] If part of the utensil was sticking out then the impurity which rests on that part spreads back through the utensil when you pull it out of […]

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Which Materials Require Tevila

The commandment of tevila in the Torah was written regarding utensils made specifically of metal. The Torah writes that gold, silver, copper, iron, tin, and lead all require tevila. Regarding other metals, such as aluminum or pewter, there are two opinions. The first opinion is that the Torah wrote about the common metals of the […]

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Introduction to Tevilat Keilim

Introduction The Gemara[1] quotes the verse כל אשר לא יבא באש תעבירו במים וטהר – “any utensil which cannot withstand koshering through fire must be passed through water”. The Gemara derives that all utensils bought from a non-Jew must have a ritual immersion – tevila – prior to using it. Rashi[2] writes that tevilat keilim […]

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Non-Jewish Help Around the House

Non-Jewish Help Around the House Because of the prevalence of non-Jewish domestic help in Jewish households, we will discuss some of the issues that can arise and some solutions. Some of the halachot discussed here are repeated from earlier chapters for the sake of clarity. This section pertains only to non-Jewish employees. In regards to […]

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Permitting Bishul Akum

Permitting Bishul Akum There are three steps in the baking process discussed in the Gemara in regards to pat akum. Any of these steps performed by a Jew would permit pat akum, and the poskim discuss if and when they apply to permit bishul akum. The Gemara writes that if a Jew either lit the […]

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When Does Bishul Akum Apply

There are two prerequisites which must be met for a food to be included in the prohibition of bishul akum. The food must be inedible when raw, and the food must be oleh al shulchan melachim – fit to be served at a king’s table. A food which does not fulfill both of these requirements […]

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Introduction to Bishul Akum

The Mishna[1] writes that there is a rabbinical prohibition to eat food cooked by a non-Jew. Rashi explains two possible reasons for this prohibition. The first reason[2] is to prevent friendliness and closeness between Jews and non-Jews, which can lead to intermarriage. This is a similar reason to the prohibition of pat akum. The second […]

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What is Considered Bread

The following is a short general explanation of which foods are included in “pat” – bread – and would have the halachot of pat akum. Only foods made from the five types of grain are included. The five grains are wheat, barley, spelt, oats, and rye. Foods made from corn flour or rice flour are […]

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When is Pat Akum Forbidden?

The Gemara (עבודה זרה לה) writes that Rebbi was visiting his students and he saw that they did not have bread to eat. Rebbi asked them “Do you not have bakers in this town?”. There are two opinions about what Rebbi meant to ask; either Rebbi was merely asking where were the Jewish bakers. Alternatively, […]

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