Halacha Tag: taste

Nat Bar Nat

The Gemara in Chullin (111b) brings down a dispute about a fish that had gotten the taste of meat from a pot and then one wants to eat the fish with dairy. Rav says that since the fish was cooked in a meat pot the fish may not be eaten with dairy because there is […]

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Bishul – Cooking

Bishul, cooking, occurs when one heats up a liquid past yad soledet bo in a utensil. Bishul uses indirect heat, meaning that the food is not being heated directly from a fire, rather the heat is being conducted through a pot before reaching the food. Bishul can occur with just a liquid, or a liquid […]

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Ben Yomo

A pot which has had hot food in it within the last 24 hours is called a ben yomo. If it did not have hot food in it within 24 hours, it is called an eino ben yomo. The taste of food that was absorbed in a pot changes from within 24 hours to after […]

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Transferring Taste

If two items (food or utensils) touch each other, they do not absorb taste from each other without a catalyst. One possible catalyst is heat. There are many different ways to produce heat in halacha; cooking, roasting, baking, and so on. As an aside, this is the reason that we use separate pots for meat […]

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Taam K’ikar – Taste is Equivalent to the Food Itself

When a food is forbidden to eat, the taste of the food is also forbidden (Chullin 98b). The Gemara in Pesachim (44b) brings two sources for this. The first source is learned from a nazarite, one who is forbidden to eat grapes. The Torah says that a nazarite cannot eat anything in which grapes have […]

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Tasting Meat

If one chewed meat and spit it out (for example, for a child), they still must wait six hours before eating dairy, in line with the Rambam’s opinion that we wait for meat stuck between the teeth (שו”ע יו”ד פט:א). If one only tasted the meat with their tongue and did not chew at all, […]

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