Inyan: Koshering Utensils

Practical Applications

A utensil that never touches food directly (such as the grate on a stovetop) does not require tevila.[1] A utensil which is always used with something covering it, such as a toaster rack that always has silver foil on it, still requires tevila, since the covering is insignificant, and is considered to be part of […]

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How to Perform Tevila

One must immerse the entire utensil in water in one shot. If a part of the utensil is sticking out of the water, the tevila is not valid.[1] If part of the utensil was sticking out then the impurity which rests on that part spreads back through the utensil when you pull it out of […]

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Which Materials Require Tevila

The commandment of tevila in the Torah was written regarding utensils made specifically of metal. The Torah writes that gold, silver, copper, iron, tin, and lead all require tevila. Regarding other metals, such as aluminum or pewter, there are two opinions. The first opinion is that the Torah wrote about the common metals of the […]

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Introduction to Tevilat Keilim

Introduction The Gemara[1] quotes the verse כל אשר לא יבא באש תעבירו במים וטהר – “any utensil which cannot withstand koshering through fire must be passed through water”. The Gemara derives that all utensils bought from a non-Jew must have a ritual immersion – tevila – prior to using it. Rashi[2] writes that tevilat keilim […]

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How To Do Libun

Ovens A conventional oven may be koshered for Pesach with libun kal. Since food does not usually touch the walls of the oven, and food on the racks are in pans, the oven itself does not have any real beliot of chametz. Since food sometimes splatters or drips, it is still proper to kosher the […]

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How To Do Hagala

Cleaning the Utensil A utensil which has holes, cracks, or crevices in it, must be cleaned thoroughly prior to hagala (שו”ע או”ח תנא:ג-ה). One should pay particular attention to the connection of the handle to the body of a pot, and to the benchmark stamps on silverware. If there are particles of food left behind, […]

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Ben Yomo – Hagala

The Rama (יו”ד קכא:ב) writes that the custom is to do hagala only when a utensil is not a ben yomo – not used in the past twenty-four hours. There are two reasons for this custom. One reason is that we don’t want a person to mistakenly do hagala on a meat utensil and dairy […]

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Types of Materials

There are a few categories of material that have their own distinct halachot when koshering utensils. Metal, Stone, Bone, and Wood Metal, stone, bone, and wood can all be koshered (שו”ע או”ח תנא:ח). Cheres – Pottery The Torah (ויקרא ו:כא) writes וכלי חרס אשר תבושל בו ישבר – pottery which the Bnei Yisrael captured in […]

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Handles of Pots

The handle of a utensil has the same status as the utensil itself. If one only koshered a utensil, but not the handle, and then cooked in it, the Rama (או”ח תנא:יב) rules that the food is permitted to eat after the fact. The Shulchan Aruch argues and rules that the food is forbidden. The […]

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Frying Pans

There is a dispute amongst the Rishonim regarding frying pans. The Rashba (תורת הבית, בית ד שער ד) writes that since many times when using a frying pan the oil burns out or the pan has very little oil in it, it is as if the pan was used for roasting and would require libun […]

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